Anger management explained with RPG

Pyschologist Dr. Abraham Twerski explains the three steps of anger as such:

  1. Anger – the feeling of anger of being provoked
  2. Rage – our reaction to anger
  3. Resentment – how long we hold on to the anger

The doctor explained how the feeling of anger itself is hardly our fault, but the reaction of rage and further resentment can be resisted. Watch the video on YouTube for more enlightenment.

Now, having recently completed the RPG game “Divinity: Original Sin 2”, I can’t help to compare those three concepts of anger to some hero skills in the game:

Anger = Provoke/Taunted

This skill is used to taunt enemies, in hope of making them attack a tougher target. It’s a distraction move, just like in real life. Anger can really ruin your day and make you lose focus on the important things, like taking down that summoner.

Rage = Enrage

This skill can be useful in game, as it guarantees more damage with critical hits, but it does mute/silences so you cannot cast any spells. In real life, rage does give you adrenaline which can be useful in a fight or flight situation. But in most cases of modern situations, a fit of rage will only bring negative effects, such as resentment.

Resentment = Challenge

The effect of this skill is what I think compares to resentment. When challenged, you are bonded to the challenger to see who falls first, with the winner getting a boost. Except in real life, the challenge is usually one way. You can deeply resent someone without their knowing it. In which case, you are taking piercing damage each turn outside of battle.

 

On a closing note, I personally think anger management is a skill. One that I am also learning myself in the office and at home, both places where it really matters to keep your cool and stay focused. I’m not going so far as to keeping an anger journal, but having an “out of self” experience such as writing this blog about anger, and comparing it to trivial things like an RPG game will hopefully help me slot this skill in memory.

 

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